Thoughts on Faith…

I am sitting here drinking barium and waiting in the doctor’s office to get a CT scan that will reveal what impact 12 treatments of chemotherapy have had on my pancreatic cancer. As I was praying, I was reminded of Jesus’ Gethsemane prayer in Matthew 26… “nevertheless, not my will but yours be done.” If Jesus were to pray this prayer today as a member of the “hyper-faith” movement, he would probably say, “Father, by the authority given to me as your Beloved Son, I claim the victory in advance over this coming Crucifixion! In your Name, I command that the forces of evil be defeated and that this cup of suffering be taken away from me! Vindicate me according to my faith.” 

Instead, what we hear from the lips of our Lord is an agonizing prayer that would not cut it in a more charismatic gathering. “My Father, if it is possible (Matthew), everything is possible for you (Mark), if you are willing (Luke)… take this cup from me. Yet, not as I will, but as you will.” The bottom line for Jesus was to do the will of God, not to escape his pain. It is faintly reminiscent of the faith-statement of Daniel’s three friends who were threatened with death in the fiery furnace if they did not bow down to Nebuchadnezzar’s golden image. “Our God, whom we serve is able to deliver us from the burning fiery furnace, and he will deliver us out of your hand, O King. But even if He doesn’t (if He is not willing), we will not serve your gods or worship the golden image you have set up.” (Dan 3:17, 18)

Do you honestly think that such a prayer made by Jesus and the confessional by Shadrach, Meshach, and Abednego demonstrate a lack of faith? There are some who would claim so—that praying for God’s will to be done is a default position that shows a shallow faith. I once heard a TV evangelist say, “For those who do not have the faith to boldly ask God for something, they always tend to meekly ask him for his will to be done.” Really? 

I believe that such a perspective shows how Satan can twist the Scripture (example of the temptation of Jesus in the wilderness) in order to sow seeds of confusion and disagreement among God’s people—all under the guise of super-spirituality. It reminds me of the teaching of the Pharisees whose twisted interpretation of the Law kept God’s people in bondage.

What has been helpful for me to think through this issue of faith and God’s will is the analogy that Jesus drew between the good gifts our Father desires to give us as his children and those we wish to bestow on our own children.  “If you then, who are evil (not a perfect parent like God), know how to give good gifts to your children, how much more will your Heavenly Father give good things to those who ask him.” (Matt 7:11) The context is where Jesus encouraged his followers to continue to ask, seek, and knock for things they desire from God. 

Let’s say your older child comes to you and presents a request in this way: “Dad (Mom), on the basis of the authority you have given me as your beloved child, I claim in advance the right to be given $250 of my future inheritance in order to pay for the repairs on my car!” Do you have any initial reactions to this scenario?

However, let’s say your child comes to you in this way: “Dad (Mom), I know that it is possible and completely within your ability to take away the burden that I have of not being able to pay my car repair bill. I also know that you love me and know what is best for me, so I trust you to do what is according to your will because what you want for me is more important than what I want for myself.” After you picked yourself up from off the floor, how would you respond to this request? Which request demonstrates the greatest amount of trust in you? 

How much more your Heavenly Father…

12 thoughts on “Thoughts on Faith…

  1. Linda Law

    Thank you for sharing these thoughts, Dave. It is good to remember that God wants us to share our feelings and pain and desires (like Jesus and David), but He also wants our submission to His gracious will.

  2. Paul

    You drew an excellent contrast between those two hypothetical scenarios. While I am nobody’s parent, I know clearly which approach to me (from anyone) would cultivate my good will toward the claimant.

  3. jax3172

    My dear friend and former pastor: it’s easy for us who are not battling a terrible illness to toss Rom 8:18 at you, but unless the Lord returns soon we’ll all be called sooner or later to reflect on where we’re going and the glory that awaits us in our darkest times. Be assured that you are always in the prayers of your brothers and sisters who love you dearly.

  4. Cathy ann Morgan

    Dave,
    I stand in all of gods gifting to you, how amazing well shagging down that wonderful chalky substance the Lord would he give you such a wonderful devil Paul analogy to our approach In prayer to our Almighty God Dash bottom line HIS will be done. THANK YOU for continuing to share your heart so openly. BTW, have you heard the results yet? Please send my love toGloria as well.

  5. Cathy Morgan

    Hi Dave, – I should have proofread my message… I hope that you can decipher it! The first. Sentence should say how amazing well chugging down that wonderful chalky substance, the Lord would give you such a wonderful analogy to our approach in prayer to our Almighty God-

    Again, THANK YOU and KNOW that we are praying for you and Gloria continually.

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